Pointless Junk.
teemspirit:

Celine Dion’s backwards blazer on the 1999 Oscars Red Carpet

teemspirit:

Celine Dion’s backwards blazer on the 1999 Oscars Red Carpet

taylor-sea:

The progression of video games in a few decades.

paris666hilton:

THIS IS ART

It’s OK to believe in life after love. Cher if u agree

the-not-here-yet:

plystation:

the scariest part of ahs coven was when white twinks kept reblogging madison montgomery gifs and tagging it #me

or when they reblogged Angela Bassett gifs and taggged it #me as well 

whatmakesyoulove:

 Female Character Meme: Day Fourteen: A older female character - Barbara Covett

People languish for years with partners who are clearly from another planet. We want so much to believe that we’ve found our other. It takes courage to recognise the real as opposed to the convenient.

ledomsh:

James McAvoy by Matt Irwin

ledomsh:

James McAvoy by Matt Irwin

Sleepy Hollow S1 Gag Reel

so, it’s a show? it’s a lifestyle. it’s a religion.

afro-dominicano:


Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest.
She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore “a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head,” writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology.
Researchers don’t know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds of people, including many others whose hairstyles are still intact, who were buried in a cemetery near an ancient city now called Amarna.

afro-dominicano:

Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest.

She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore “a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head,” writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology.

Researchers don’t know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds of people, including many others whose hairstyles are still intact, who were buried in a cemetery near an ancient city now called Amarna.